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Schedule of Events

 


Next Leadership 
Team Meeting

Sun., Nov. 5, 2017

Events Completed in FY 2017
December 1, 2016 to date

Thurs., Dec. 8, 2016

Hemlock Field Insectary Planting: SGH launched its Hemlock Field Insectary Program with a project on the campus of the University of North Georgia in Dahlonega.  On an east-facing hillside behind the predator beetle lab, twenty-five volunteers  from UNG, SGH, and the Georgia Mountains Master Gardeners planted 24 healthy hemlock saplings that will ultimately be used for raising predator beetles to control the hemlock woolly adelgid.   During the planting the trees were given a 5-year HWA protection treatment to allow them to grow large enough to serve as insectary trees.

Thurs., Dec. 15, 2016

Brown Bag Lecture Series:  SGH gave a presentation at Elachee Nature Center in Gainesville about the invasive insect that's killing our hemlocks, what can be done to save the trees, why it's so important to do so, and how volunteers can help.   The thirteen attendees asked dozens of very good questions and several expressed an interest in becoming volunteers to help save the hemlocks.

Tues., Dec. 20, 2016

Hemlock Treatment Project at Tallulah Gorge:  Sixteen volunteers from SGH, the Georgia DNR, and Americore worked together to treat 225 hemlocks in Tallulah Gorge State Park near Clayton.  The site is an environmentally sensitive area of Rabun County that is home to an extremely rare species of wildflower -- persistent trillium.   These beautiful but endangered shade-loving plants are growing under, and highly dependent on, a five-acre canopy of hemlocks which themselves are threatened by the hemlock woolly adelgid. 

Sun., Jan. 15

SGH Leadership Team winter meeting:  Held at the home of Donna Shearer, this meeting served as the kick-off for what promises to be a very busy and productive year in 2017.  Click here for the meeting notes.

Mon., Jan. 16

Martin Luther King Day of Service

Hope you all went out and did a good thing in your community today!

Tues., Jan. 17

TU Tailwater Chapter logo

SGH Presentation to TU:  SGH gave a presentation to 11 members of the Trout Unlimited Tailwater Chapter about the invasive insect that's killing our hemlocks, what can be done to save the trees, why it's so important to do so, and how volunteers can help.   In addition, special materials highlighted the importance of hemlocks to the health of local trout populations, our new joint initiative for hemlock canopy restoration on trout streams, and opportunities to work together on behalf of the forests and waterways we share.

Fri., Jan. 20

SGH Sapling Rescue and Potting Tutorial:  John Shearouse, technical advisor for our saplings program, conducted an in-depth field lesson for 5 members of our Leadership Team on the proper techniques for digging hemlock saplings and seedlings and potting them for future use.   We learned about optimal conditions for digging, specimen selection, maintenance between digging and potting, branch and root pruning, nutritional requirements, and storage considerations.

He also share with us the foundations for establishing distributed sapling nurseries in several counties across north Georgia.  THANKS, JOHN!

Tues., Jan. 31
& Wed., Feb. 1

 

More dates to come

USFS Landscape Foothills Collaboration Workshops:  Based on the information gathered by the U.S. Forest Service during their Community Conversations meeting during the fall of 2016, they have announced four workshops that will be held between now and the end of August.  Their invitation states, “These workshops will be focused on developing a plan that will be used to create a proposed action for the Foothills Landscape. This is a great opportunity to share your views, discuss ideas, and interact with other members of the collaboration community and Forest Service employees -- a time to roll up your sleeves and really get to work!”

The first one was held on January 31 and February 1 in Dahlonega. 

Tues., Feb. 7

SGH Presentation to TU:  SGH gave a presentation to 30 members of the Trout Unlimited Gold Rush Chapter about the invasive insect that's killing our hemlocks, what can be done to save the trees, why it's so important to do so, and how volunteers can help.  

In addition, the program highlighted our new joint initiative for hemlock canopy restoration on trout streams and opportunities to work together on behalf of the forests and waterways we share.

Fri., Feb. 17

Arbor Day in GeorgiaThis holiday is a day set aside for schools, civic clubs, and other organizations, as well as individuals, to reflect on the importance of trees in our state and across our nation.  Every tree planted on Arbor Day helps clean the air and water, beautify neighborhoods, provide homes for wildlife, conserve energy, and prevent soil erosion, among many other benefits. 

Arbor Day gives everyone an opportunity to learn about the benefits trees provide to communities.  You can also order tree seedlings from the Georgia Forestry Commission.

If you've seen hemlocks that aren't looking healthy and you're wondering why, please read this reprinted article and then contact us for an update on what's happening.

Fri., Feb. 24

SGH Hemlock Training at Smithgall Woods:  Six volunteers who plan to help with the hemlock treatment project at Smithgall Woods on March 4 and/or March 11 attended this class.  It covered the basic tasks of:

* identifying viable hemlocks and assessing their condition,
* measuring and tagging them,
* mixing the treatment material and applying it by soil injection,
* recording the required information on data sheets, and
* personal and environmental safety on this project.

Sat., Feb. 25

SGH Clinic & Facilitator Training in Dahlonega:  Four new Facilitators were trained at this class designed for people who want to understand the hemlock problem, learn the processes for saving the trees, and then be of service within the community. 

Sat., Mar. 4

SGH Clinic & Facilitator Training in Gainesville:  Four new Facilitators were trained at this class designed for people who want to understand the hemlock problem, learn the processes for saving the trees, and then be of service within the community. 

Sat., Mar. 11

Hemlock Treatment Project at Smithgall Woods:  Twenty-three volunteers from SGH, the Georgia DNR, and Friends of Smithgall Woods worked together to treat or retreat the hemlocks in the park.  This was the first day of a multi-day project to continue protecting a total of 1,800 trees there.   THANKS EVERYONE!

Tues., Mar. 21

International Day of Forests and the Tree:  This global celebration of forests provides a platform to raise awareness of the importance of all types of forests and of trees outside forests

If you're concerned about the hemlocks in our forests, please read this reprinted article and then contact us for an update on how you can help.

Sat., Mar. 25

SGH Clinic & Facilitator Training in Jasper:  Five new Facilitators were trained at this class designed for people who want to understand the hemlock problem, learn the processes for saving the trees, and then be of service within the community. 

Tues., Mar. 28 &
Wed., Mar. 29

 

More dates to come

USFS Foothills Landscape Collaboration Workshop:  Based on the information gathered by the U.S. Forest Service during their Community Conversations meeting during the fall of 2016, they have announced the second round of workshops to be held this year.   These workshops will focus on:

* narrowing the focus of the project by determining the greatest needs for restoration using the information harvested from the first round of workshops in fall of 2016;
* turning the identified needs into specific, practical, reasonable and measurable goal statements; and
* framing what the Collaborative Community will recommend in Workshops III and IV.

A representative of SGH participated in this workshop.

Wed., Mar 29

SGH Presentation to Master Naturalists:  SGH gave a presentation to 22 members of the Fannin County Master Naturalists class about the invasive insect that's killing our hemlocks; the cultural, chemical, and biological approaches to saving the trees; why it's so important to do so; and how volunteers (including youth) can help.   The outdoor segment of the class focused on assessing tree and site conditions and practicing treatment techniques (trunk spray of Safari and soil injection of Imidacloprid) on about a dozen infested trees on the Bonnie Higdon Reeves campus of the University of North Georgia in Epworth .  A healthy hemlock sapling was donated to be raffled to those attending.

Sat., Apr. 1

Tailwater Trout Unlimited Spring Fling:  SGH had an information table at this event at the Buford Trout Hatchery in Cumming to provide information about the hemlock problem, why it's so important to take timely action, what property owners can do to save their own trees, and how volunteers can help save trees on our public lands.  Healthy hemlock saplings were available for adoption.

Thurs., Apr. 6

Hemlock Lesson for Environmental Issues Class:  SGH gave a one-hour Hemlock Lesson to 16 students from Kelly West's Environmental Issues class at the University of North Georgia.  It presented information on the keystone role the hemlocks play in the environment, the predicted consequences of a mass die-off, and the steps that can be taken to save these valuable trees.  Then they helped pot almost 70 hemlock saplings for future use in hemlock restoration projects, field insectaries, planting on school campuses, and adoptions. 

Sun., Apr. 9

SGH Leadership Team spring meeting:  Leadership Team members and Program Managers gathered for this quarterly meeting at 37 Woody Bend, Dahlonega.  Click here for the agenda.  Meeting notes will be posted shortly.

Sat., Apr. 15

SGH-USFS HEMLOCK TREATMENT PROJECT  in the Rabun Recreation Area (Campground 2):  Twenty-four volunteers came out for this service event at Angel Falls/Panther Trail near Lakemont.   After a short orientation and safety briefing, they worked in teams to treat approximately 300 trees, pausing at mid-day for a picnic lunch. 

THANKS EVERYONE  for a fun and successful day in the woods!  We'll be going back on May 6 to treat more trees in Campgrounds 1 and 2.  Hope you can join us again.

Mon., Apr. 17

University of North Georgia Earth Day Celebration:  SGH had an information booth at this event on the UNG Gainesville Campus to provide information about the hemlock problem, why it's so important to take timely action, what property owners can do to save their own trees, and how volunteers can help save trees on our public lands.  A few healthy hemlock saplings were adopted into new homes.

Thurs., Apr. 20

SGH Presentation to Master Gardeners:  SGH gave a presentation to the new class of Georgia Mountains Master Gardeners about the invasive insect that's killing our hemlocks, what can be done to save the trees, why it's so important to do so, and how volunteers can help.   Afterwards the group took a field trip to the University of North Georgia campus to tour the new hemlock field insectary and beetle lab and get an update on current bio-control efforts.

Sat., Apr. 22

Earth Day:  Celebrated on April 22 annually, Earth Day is globally coordinated by the Earth Day Network, whose year-round mission is to broaden, diversify and activate the environmental movement worldwide, through a combination of education, public policy, and consumer campaigns.  Click to read announcement of the Global Climate Change Agreement, December 12, 2016.

If you have hemlocks that haven't been protected, please read this reprinted article and then contact us for an update on what you can do.

Sat., Apr. 22

SGH Clinic & Facilitator Training in Ellijay:  Four new Facilitators were trained and one was refreshed at this class designed for people who want to understand the hemlock problem, learn the processes for saving the trees, and then be of service within the community. 

Sat., Apr. 22 &
Sun., Apr. 23

Bear on the Square Mountain Festival:  SGH had an information booth at this fun festival in Dahlonega to provide information about the hemlock problem, why it's so important to take timely action, what property owners can do to save their own trees, and how volunteers can help save trees on our public lands.   We had approximately 140 visitors to our booth, and fifteen healthy hemlock saplings were adopted in new forever homes.

Sat., Apr. 22 Hemlock dedication ceremony:  As part of the Bear on the Square Mountain Festival, the City of Dahlonega and SGH held a short ceremony to dedicate a group of hemlock trees recently planted in Wimpy Mill Park for the public's enjoyment.   It included brief remarks by City Councilman Sam Norton and SGH Chairman Donna Shearer about the importance of hemlocks in our community.  The park is located at the intersection of Wimpy Mill Rd. and Sky Country Rd., Dahlonega.

Sat., Apr. 29

Trout Fest:  SGH had an information booth at this important festival in Blue Ridge to provide information about the hemlock problem, why it's so important to take timely action, what property owners can do to save their own trees, and how volunteers can help save trees on our public lands.  In addition, special materials were provided to highlight the importance of hemlocks to the health of local trout populations, our partnership with Trout Unlimited, and opportunities to work together on behalf of the forests and waterways we share.

Approximately 175 people visited our booth.  Eighteen healthy hemlock saplings were adopted into new forever homes, and three extra large saplings were donated for planting in Tammen Park. 

Sat., May 6

SGH-USFS HEMLOCK TREATMENT PROJECT  in the Rabun Recreation Area - Campgrounds 1 and 2 near Lakemont.   After a short orientation and safety briefing, volunteers worked in teams to treat approximately 300 trees, pausing at mid-day for a picnic lunch.   THANKS EVERYONE!!!

Sat., May 6

SGH Clinic & Facilitator Training in Blairsville:  Thirteen new Facilitators were trained at this class designed for people who want to understand the hemlock problem, learn the processes for saving the trees, and then be of service within the community. 

Sat., May 6
 

Reece Farm Earth Day Celebration:  SGH had an information table at this enjoyable (free) community event and also gave a brief presentation to provide information about the hemlock problem, why it's so important to take timely action, what property owners can do to save their own trees, and how volunteers can help save trees on our public lands.   Healthy hemlock saplings were available for adoption.

Thurs., May 18

Plant Conservation Day:  This global celebration is dedicated to preserving, protecting, and conserving plants for people and the planet.  Plants are the backbone of all life on Earth: they regulate our climate, purify our water, help create rich soils and protect those soils from erosion.

Plants, in their amazing diversity, are also an essential resource for human survival and well-being: they provide food, medicine, shelter, and clothing, and are a source of unending beauty.  Can you imagine what the world would be with without plants?  Click here to learn more about why plants are so important.

Unfortunately, the plants that are vital to people and the planet are facing serious threats in your backyard and around the world.   Click here to learn more about why plants need your help.

There are many ways you can help conserve plants for the planet.  Help raise awareness by celebrating your own Plant Conservation Day, or find out more about how you can make a difference.

Fri., May 19

Endangered Species Day:  Each year the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service observes Endangered Species Day in order to recognize the national conservation effort to protect our nation's endangered species and their habitats.  Click here to learn about the Endangered Species Act and find interesting ways to engage kids, families, youth groups, and educators in this important effort.

Sat., May 13 Just FYI -- Invasive Plant Hands-on Workshop at McCoy Farm and Gardens in Walden, TN. 
Click here to read the flyer.
Sat., May 20

SGH Clinic & Facilitator Training in Chatsworth:  One new Facilitator was trained at this class designed for people who want to understand the hemlock problem, learn the processes for saving the trees, and then be of service within the community. 

Tues., May 23

USFS Foothills Landscape Collaboration Workshop The U. S. Forest Service invited the public to participate in the third of four collaborative workshops focused on developing a plan that will be used to create a proposed action for the Foothills Landscape.  The meetings so far have served to outline the existing and achievable future conditions of the Foothills and define desired goals.

The Tuesday meeting centered around potential changes to recreational opportunities, restoration opportunities for early successional habitat, areas suitable for timber sale operations, and woodland restoration.  Wednesday evening dealt with watershed restoration and reducing the risk of wildfire in the wildland urban interface.  Click here to read the flyer.

Sat., May 27 &
Sun., May 28

Blue Ridge Spring Arts in the Park Festival SGH had an information booth to provide information about the hemlock problem, why it's so important to take timely action, what property owners can do to save their own trees, and how volunteers can help save trees on our public lands.   Approximately 700 people visited our booth over the two days, and 59 healthy hemlock saplings found new homes.

Sun., May 28
 

Lake Rabun Association Memorial Day Meeting:  SGH had an educational exhibit, gave a brief presentation to approximately 100 attendees about the hemlocks and their importance to the Lake Rabun community, and provided printed hemlock information to property owners.  Several hemlock saplings were adopted too.

Wed., May 31
 

SGH presentation and hemlock treatment project:  The Achasta Garden Club sponsored a hemlock lesson for members of the neighborhood to provide an overview of what’s killing the hemlocks, what can be done to save them, and why it’s so important to do so.   Nine garden club members attended.  Following the lesson, participants took part in a short project to treat half a dozen nearby hemlocks along Birch River Dr.

Sat., June 3

National Trails Day:  A celebration of America’s magnificent Trail System, NTD occurs annually on the first Saturday in June and features a series of outdoor activities, designed to promote and celebrate the importance of trails in the United States.  Individuals, clubs and organizations from around the country host National Trails Day® events to share their love of trails with friends, family, and their communities.  NTD introduces thousands of Americans to a wide array of trail activities: hiking, biking, paddling, horseback riding, trail running, and bird watching and more.  For public and private land managers alike, National Trails Day® is a great time to showcase beautiful landscapes and special or threatened locales as thousands of people will be outside looking to participate in NTD events.

Sat., June 3
 

Hemlock Day at Anna Ruby Falls:  In celebration of National Trails Day, SGH had an information booth to provide information about the hemlock problem, why it's so important to take timely action, what property owners can do to save their own trees, and how volunteers can help save trees on our public lands.   We had approximately 100 visitors to our booth and found new adoptive homes for 11 healthy hemlock saplings.

Sat., June 10

SGH Clinic & Facilitator Training in Clayton:  Three new Facilitators were trained at this class designed for people who want to understand the hemlock problem, learn the processes for saving the trees, and then be of service within the community. 

Mon., June 19

SGH Hemlock Training for Boy Scouts in Woodstock:  In support of an Eagle Scout project led by a young man from the Woodstock BSA troop, SGH conducted training for about 30 scouts and leaders to prepare volunteers  to treat 200-300 hemlocks on a national forest site in Rabun County on July 15. 

Sun., June 25
 

SGH HEMLOCK CAMP MEETING & ANNUAL MEETING
Click here for the detailed invitation flyer and the program.  More than 100 people attended this event at the ETC Pavilion in Ellijay, including representatives from a dozen environmental, conservation, and recreational organizations.

* great music by Downtown Roy
* interesting exhibits & activities with conservation and recreation groups, the beetle labs, and our public land managers
* delicious food by Poole's Barbecue and your own favorite covered side dishes
* a message of good news about the hemlocks & information about how volunteers can get engaged from Dr. Justin Ellis
* a chance to meet other like-minded people
* a time to be appreciated for all the good work you do!

Tues., July 4

Independence Day:  This is a good day to enjoy with your family and friends by doing something good for your community.

Tues., July 11

USFS Foothills Landscape Collaboration Workshop IV.  Here's the message from the Forest Service:

"We dug into some of the specifics of the Foothills Landscape project at the third workshop held last month.  There was a discussion on young forest creation, changes to the recreation program, woodland restoration, watershed improvement and reduction the risk to the wildland urban interface.  Check out last month's webinar if you have questions.   At this meeting we'll be delving further into how we might accomplish the project goals. 

"This will not be the end of our journey.  We will pick things back up with Community Conversations in August and September ... and then again next winter as we start to develop alternatives to the proposed action  and begin to analyze potential effects of the project.  Check out the When to Get On the Bus brochure for more details."

The location for this meeting was Mulberry Gap in Ellijay. 

Sat., July 15

SGH-USFS HEMLOCK TREATMENT PROJECT  on the National Forest in the Sarah's Creek HCA near Clayton.   This event was the special project of Evan Barker, Eagle Scout candidate from BSA Troop 4900 from Woodstock.

After a short orientation and safety briefing, volunteers worked in teams to treat 251 trees in and around the camping area, pausing at mid-day for a picnic lunch.  Experienced hands and newbies alike had a fun and worthwhile day in the woods.

Fri., July 28

SGH Presentation to Boy Scouts at Scoutland for Hornaday Weekend:  SGH presented a special program to 30 Scouts and their leaders about the hemlocks and their importance, the threat these valuable trees are facing, and a number of ways Scouts can serve their community by helping to preserve and protect the trees -- and earn merit badges in the process.

Sat., July 29

SGH-USFS HEMLOCK TREATMENT PROJECT  on the National Forest in Warwoman Dell near Clayton:  After a short orientation and safety briefing, 14 volunteers worked in teams to treat or retreat approximately 250 trees, pausing at mid-day for a picnic lunch.  It was a beautiful cool and breezy day in the woods, just perfect for getting together with a fun group of outdoor enthusiasts and doing volunteer work that will have a lasting benefit for years to come   THANKS EVERYONE!

Sun., Aug. 6

SGH Leadership Team summer meeting:  Held at the home of Donna Shearer, this meeting included a review of accomplishments to date, a recap and evaluation of our Hemlock Camp Meeting, and discussion on several new events currently being added to our calendar.  

Click here for the agenda.  Meeting notes coming soon.

Sat., Aug. 26

SGH Clinic & Facilitator Training in Clarkesville:  Nine new Facilitators were trained in this class designed for people who want to understand the hemlock problem, learn the processes for saving the trees, and then be of service within the community. 

Wed., Aug. 30

SGH Hemlock Training for Americorps:   SGH conducted a special training workshop at Tallulah Gorge State Park for 8 Americorps volunteers working with the DNR.  Following an overview of the problem our hemlocks are facing and why timely intervention is crucial, the workshop provided complete how-to instruction covering the trees, the insects, assessing infestations, chemical treatments, personal and environmental safety plus a segment for demonstration and hands-on practice.

Sun., Sept. 3
 

Lake Rabun Association Labor Day Meeting:  SGH had an educational exhibit, gave a brief presentation about the hemlocks and their importance to the Lake Rabun community, and provided printed hemlock information to property owners.

Mon., Sept. 4

National Wildlife Day:  Founded in 2005 and carried forward in the memory of animal lover and conservationist Steve Irwin, National Wildlife Day serves to bring awareness to the number of endangered animals nationally, as well as globally, that need to be preserved and rescued from their demise each year, and also to acknowledge zoos and outstanding animal sanctuaries and organizations globally for everything they do to help preserve this planet's animals and educate the public about conservation - especially to children....our animal's future caretakers and conservationists.

   

© Save Georgia's Hemlocks 2009.  Last updated 08/08/2017.
Send comments or questions by e-mail  or call the Hemlock Help LineSM  706-429-8010.