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Schedule of Events

 


Next Leadership 
Team Meeting

Sun., Apr. 9, 2017

Events Completed in FY 2017
December 1, 2016 to date

Thurs., Dec. 8, 2016

Hemlock Field Insectary Planting: SGH launched its Hemlock Field Insectary Program with a project on the campus of the University of North Georgia in Dahlonega.  On an east-facing hillside behind the predator beetle lab, twenty-five volunteers  from UNG, SGH, and the Georgia Mountains Master Gardeners planted 24 healthy hemlock saplings that will ultimately be used for raising predator beetles to control the hemlock woolly adelgid.   During the planting the trees were given a 5-year HWA protection treatment to allow them to grow large enough to serve as insectary trees.

Thurs., Dec. 15, 2016

Brown Bag Lecture Series:  SGH gave a presentation at Elachee Nature Center in Gainesville about the invasive insect that's killing our hemlocks, what can be done to save the trees, why it's so important to do so, and how volunteers can help.   The thirteen attendees asked dozens of very good questions and several expressed an interest in becoming volunteers to help save the hemlocks.

Tues., Dec. 20, 2016

Hemlock Treatment Project at Tallulah Gorge:  Sixteen volunteers from SGH, the Georgia DNR, and Americore worked together to treat 225 hemlocks in Tallulah Gorge State Park near Clayton.  The site is an environmentally sensitive area of Rabun County that is home to an extremely rare species of wildflower -- persistent trillium.   These beautiful but endangered shade-loving plants are growing under, and highly dependent on, a five-acre canopy of hemlocks which themselves are threatened by the hemlock woolly adelgid. 

Sun., Jan. 15

SGH Leadership Team winter meeting:  Held at the home of Donna Shearer, this meeting served as the kick-off for what promises to be a very busy and productive year in 2017.  Click here for the meeting notes.

Mon., Jan. 16

Martin Luther King Day of Service

Hope you all went out and did a good thing in your community today!

Tues., Jan. 17

TU Tailwater Chapter logo

SGH Presentation to TU:  SGH gave a presentation to 11 members of the Trout Unlimited Tailwater Chapter about the invasive insect that's killing our hemlocks, what can be done to save the trees, why it's so important to do so, and how volunteers can help.   In addition, special materials highlighted the importance of hemlocks to the health of local trout populations, our new joint initiative for hemlock canopy restoration on trout streams, and opportunities to work together on behalf of the forests and waterways we share.

Fri., Jan. 20

SGH Sapling Rescue and Potting Tutorial:  John Shearouse, technical advisor for our saplings program, conducted an in-depth field lesson for 5 members of our Leadership Team on the proper techniques for digging hemlock saplings and seedlings and potting them for future use.   We learned about optimal conditions for digging, specimen selection, maintenance between digging and potting, branch and root pruning, nutritional requirements, and storage considerations.

He also share with us the foundations for establishing distributed sapling nurseries in several counties across north Georgia.  THANKS, JOHN!

Tues., Jan. 31
& Wed., Feb. 1

 

More dates to come

USFS Landscape Foothills Collaboration Workshops:  Based on the information gathered by the U.S. Forest Service during their Community Conversations meeting during the fall of 2016, they have announced four workshops that will be held between now and the end of August.  Their invitation states, “These workshops will be focused on developing a plan that will be used to create a proposed action for the Foothills Landscape. This is a great opportunity to share your views, discuss ideas, and interact with other members of the collaboration community and Forest Service employees -- a time to roll up your sleeves and really get to work!”

The first one was held on January 31 and February 1 in Dahlonega. 

Tues., Feb. 7

SGH Presentation to TU:  SGH gave a presentation to 30 members of the Trout Unlimited Gold Rush Chapter about the invasive insect that's killing our hemlocks, what can be done to save the trees, why it's so important to do so, and how volunteers can help.  

In addition, the program highlighted our new joint initiative for hemlock canopy restoration on trout streams and opportunities to work together on behalf of the forests and waterways we share.

Fri., Feb. 17

Arbor Day in GeorgiaThis holiday is a day set aside for schools, civic clubs, and other organizations, as well as individuals, to reflect on the importance of trees in our state and across our nation.  Every tree planted on Arbor Day helps clean the air and water, beautify neighborhoods, provide homes for wildlife, conserve energy, and prevent soil erosion, among many other benefits. 

Arbor Day gives everyone an opportunity to learn about the benefits trees provide to communities.  You can also order tree seedlings from the Georgia Forestry Commission.

If you've seen hemlocks that aren't looking healthy and you're wondering why, please read this reprinted article and then contact us for an update on what's happening.

Fri., Feb. 24

SGH Hemlock Training at Smithgall Woods:  Six volunteers who plan to help with the hemlock treatment project at Smithgall Woods on March 4 and/or March 11 attended this class.  It covered the basic tasks of:

* identifying viable hemlocks and assessing their condition,
* measuring and tagging them,
* mixing the treatment material and applying it by soil injection,
* recording the required information on data sheets, and
* personal and environmental safety on this project.

Sat., Feb. 25

SGH Clinic & Facilitator Training in Dahlonega:  Four new Facilitators attended this class designed for people who want to understand the hemlock problem, learn the processes for saving the trees, and then be of service within the community. 

Sat., Mar. 4

SGH Clinic & Facilitator Training in Gainesville:  Four new Facilitators attended this class designed for people who want to understand the hemlock problem, learn the processes for saving the trees, and then be of service within the community. 

Sat., Mar. 11

Hemlock Treatment Project at Smithgall Woods:  Twenty-three volunteers from SGH, the Georgia DNR, and Friends of Smithgall Woods worked together to treat or retreat the hemlocks in the park.  This was the first day of a multi-day project to continue protecting a total of 1,800 trees there.   THANKS EVERYONE!

Tues., Mar. 21

International Day of Forests and the Tree:  This global celebration of forests provides a platform to raise awareness of the importance of all types of forests and of trees outside forests

If you're concerned about the hemlocks in our forests, please read this reprinted article and then contact us for an update on how you can help.

   

© Save Georgia's Hemlocks 2009.  Last updated 02/01/2017.
Send comments or questions by e-mail  or call the Hemlock Help LineSM  706-429-8010.