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Schedule of Events

 


Next Leadership 
Team Meeting

Sun., July 10, 2016

Schedule of Events

The calendar below shows the SGH presentations, training, service projects, and fairs/festivals that are scheduled so far for FY 2016, followed by those that have already been completed.  We're still planning many more educational events and service projects for this year and will post that information here as each one is scheduled.

Presentations and Training:  Throughout the year, we offer Hemlock Help Clinics for a wide variety of audiences, Facilitator training for volunteers, Hemlock Lessons for elementary through high school classes, and special presentations for garden clubs, property owner associations, churches, civic organizations, and community groups.

Service Projects:  We will continue our partnership with the U. S. Forest Service and the Georgia Department of Natural Resources to treat hemlocks on public lands and will undertake additional hemlock treatment projects for other nonprofits, public land managers, and private property owners whenever we can.  We will also conduct a number of hemlock rescue and planting projects.

If you'd like to participate in a class or event that's on our calendar or would like to schedule an additional educational event or service project, please call the Hemlock Help Line 706-429-8010.

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Scheduled Events for FY 2016 (Dec. 1, 2015 - Nov. 30, 2016)

Sat., July 23

SGH Hemlock Training in Gilmer County: 

10 - 11 a.m. Hemlock Help Clinic -- an overview presentation on the invasive insect that’s killing our hemlocks, why it matters, and what people can do to save their trees.  This class is a prerequisite for the Facilitator Training Workshop.  Click here for a course description and outline Professional CEUs are available.

11 a.m. - 3 p.m. Facilitator Training Workshop -- complete how-to instruction covering the trees, the insects, assessing infestations, cultural practices, chemical treatments, biological controls, cost considerations, personal and environmental safety.  This class also prepares volunteers to advise and assist other property owners, work with the U. S. Forest Service and Georgia DNR to save trees on our public lands, participate in special hemlock initiatives such as replanting hemlocks along trout streams, raising hemlock saplings, and more.  Click here for a course description and outline Professional CEUs are available.

REGISTRATION IS REQUIRED.  Contact Chris Curtin at christead@yahoo.com or 404-630-0156.   Location is the Gilmer County Library, 268 Calvin Jackson Dr. in Ellijay.

Tues., July 26
10:30 a.m.

Hemlock Restoration on Trout Streams:  SGH and representatives of Trout Unlimited Blue Ridge Chapter will meet to begin implementation of our Initiative for Hemlock Restoration on Trout Streams, a long-term partnership effort to restore healthy hemlocks along key trout streams where the trees have been lost to the hemlock woolly adelgid.  The results are expected to benefit stream quality, trout populations, fly fishing enthusiasts, other individuals and families who enjoy the waterways, as well as businesses and communities that rely on revenue from tourism and recreation. 

The first project this fall will be planting hemlock saplings along a designated segment of trout stream that runs through Toccoa Bend in Suches.   Additional projects, some of which will utilize a $2,500 grant SGH received from the North Georgia EMC, will be scheduled for this fall and next spring.

While the initial phase will consist of reforestation projects on private and non-federal public lands, the ultimate goal is to provide a protocol for this initiative to be included in the U. S. Forest Service's Environmental Assessment document currently in process of being updated.  The revised document will govern forest management practices on the Chattahoochee-Oconee National Forest for the next 10 years.

VOLUNTEERS WILL BE NEEDED from SGH, TU chapters, and the community at large.  Please review the concept document, and then let us know of your interest in helping!

Thurs., Aug. 4
7 - 9 p.m.

Boy Scout Leaders Round Table Meeting:  SGH will have an information table and display at this meeting to share opportunities for Scouts to participate in various educational and/or service events, earn service credits and merit badges, or create several kinds of Eagle Scout projects. 

Location will be the First United Methodist Church of Canton, 930 Lower Scott Mill Rd, Canton, GA 30115.

Wed., Aug. 17
2 - 5 p.m.

SGH Hemlock Training for Americore: 

10 - 11 a.m. Hemlock Help Clinic -- SGH will conduct a special training workshop for Americore volunteers working with the DNR.  Following an overview of the problem our hemlocks are facing and why timely intervention is crucial, the workshop will provide complete how-to instruction covering the trees, the insects, assessing infestations, chemical treatments, personal and environmental safety. 

Location will be in the Tallulah Gorge area; Americore volunteers will receive details from the DNR.

Sat., Aug. 27

SGH Hemlock Training in Fannin County: 

10 - 11 a.m. Hemlock Help Clinic -- an overview presentation on the invasive insect that’s killing our hemlocks, why it matters, and what people can do to save their trees.  This class is a prerequisite for the Facilitator Training Workshop.  Click here for a course description and outline Professional CEUs are available.

11 a.m. - 3 p.m. Facilitator Training Workshop -- complete how-to instruction covering the trees, the insects, assessing infestations, cultural practices, chemical treatments, biological controls, cost considerations, personal and environmental safety.  This class also prepares volunteers to advise and assist other property owners, work with the U. S. Forest Service and Georgia DNR to save trees on our public lands, participate in special hemlock initiatives such as replanting hemlocks along trout streams, raising hemlock saplings, and more.  Click here for a course description and outline Professional CEUs are available.

REGISTRATION IS REQUIRED.  Contact Cynthia Maude (cynthiamaude@tds.net or 706-633-7748).   Location is the Fannin County Chamber of Commerce, 152 Orvin Lance Rd. in Blue Ridge.

Sat., Aug. 27,
10 a.m. - 5 p.m. &
Sun., Aug 28,
10 a.m. - 4 p.m.

Young Harris Art FestSGH will have an information booth at the festival in Young Harris to provide information about the hemlock problem, why it's so important to take timely action, what property owners can do to save their own trees, and how volunteers can help save trees on our public lands.   Healthy hemlock saplings will also be available for adoption.

Location is Mayors Park, 50 Irene Berry Dr, Young Harris, GA 30582.

Sat., Sept. 3 &
Sun., Sept. 4,
9 a.m. - 5 p.m.

Mountain Heritage FestivalSGH will have an information booth at the festival in Dahlonega to provide information about the hemlock problem, why it's so important to take timely action, what property owners can do to save their own trees, and how volunteers can help save trees on our public lands.  We had 104 visitors to our booth.  Healthy hemlock saplings will also be available for adoption.

Location is one block south of the Town Square, Blairsville, on U.S. 19 /129.

Sun., Sept. 4

Lake Rabun Association Labor Day Meeting:  SGH will have an exhibit, give a brief presentation, and provide printed hemlock information to property owners who attend the meeting in Lakemont.

Sun., Sept. 4

National Wildlife Day:  Founded in 2005 and carried forward in the memory of animal lover and conservationist Steve Irwin, National Wildlife Day serves to bring awareness to the number of endangered animals nationally, as well as globally, that need to be preserved and rescued from their demise each year, and also to acknowledge zoos and outstanding animal sanctuaries and organizations globally for everything they do to help preserve this planet's animals and educate the public about conservation - especially to children....our animal's future caretakers and conservationists.

Sat., Sept. 9 &
Sun., Sept. 10

Appalachian Trail CommunityTrail Fest:  SGH will have an information booth at the festival in Dahlonega to provide information about the hemlock problem, why it's so important to take timely action, what property owners can do to save their own trees, and how volunteers can help save trees on our public lands.  We had 104 visitors to our booth.  Healthy hemlock saplings will also be available for adoption.

Location is the Historic Square and Hancock Park in Dahlonega.

Fri., Sept. 23
9 a.m. - 4 p.m.

Atlanta Canopy Conference:  This summer Trees Atlanta is rallying the city and its friends to reestablish Atlanta as "The City in the Forest" – a civic identity that brings everyone together to protect the natural feature that makes Atlanta unique.  Other cities may have their rivers, or mountains, or harbors…Atlanta has its our urban forest. 

Save the date for this full-day conference focused on the vision, design, implementation, and impact of the Atlanta BeltLine Arboretum. Connecting 45 Atlanta neighborhoods and 57 city parks, the Atlanta BeltLine becomes more than a transit corridor when complemented by the living collections that will surround all 22-miles of trails.  Hosted by Trees Atlanta with the support and collaboration of key organizations spanning environmental conservation, academics, arboriculture, landscape architecture, city planning, and others. The keynote speaker will be Darrel Morrison, an ecologically-based landscape architect internationally renowned for his expertise using native plants for urban landscape design and management. 

Conference registration will open July 8, 2016. Full day registration, including several CEU eligible sessions, and half-day general interest registration will be offered.  For more information, call 404) 522-4097.

Sat., Sept. 24

National Public Lands Day:  National Public Lands Day (NPLD) is the nation's largest, single-day volunteer effort for public lands.  Its purposes are:

* educating Americans about the environment and natural resources, and the need for shared stewardship of these valued, irreplaceable lands;
* building partnerships between the public sector and the local community based upon mutual interests in the enhancement and restoration of America's public lands; and;
* improving public lands for outdoor recreation, with volunteers assisting land managers in hands-on work.

Sat., Sept. 24,
9:30 a.m. - 3:00 p.m.

SGH-BMTA ANNUAL HIKE & HELP THE HEMLOCKS: 
VOLUNTEERS ARE NEEDED
.  For the seventh consecutive year,  SGH and the Benton MacKaye Trail Association will again partner with the U. S. Forest Service for this event that combines education and service in celebration of National Public Lands Day. 

At the start of the day, volunteers will receive a brief orientation and safety reminder and then work in teams to treat or retreat the trees in the Stanley Creek hemlock conservation area near Fall Branch Falls near Cherry Log in Gilmer County.  At midday everyone will come together for a picnic lunch and some interesting lunch-and-learn presentations, including how to treat your own trees, an update on what's happening in the forest, news about bio-controls, and more.  After lunch teams will finish the treatment activity and be ready to depart no later than 3 p.m.

Sign-up is required.  For information or to volunteer, please call 706-429-8010 or email donna@savegeorgiashemlocks.org.

Location and other details will be posted soon. 

Sat., Oct. 1,
8 a.m. - 5 p.m.

Foxfire Mountaineer Festival SGH will have an information booth at this fun event in Rabun County to provide information about the hemlock problem, why it's so important to take timely action, what property owners can do to save their own trees, and how volunteers can help save trees on our public lands.  Healthy hemlock saplings will also be available for adoption. 

Location is the Civic Center, 201 West Savannah St. in Clayton.

Sat., Oct. 1 &
Sun., Oct. 2,
9 a.m. - 5 p.m.

Indian Summer Festival: S GH will have an information booth at this event in Jasper to provide information about the hemlock problem, why it's so important to take timely action, what property owners can do to save their own trees, and how volunteers can help save trees on our public lands.  Healthy hemlock saplings were also available for adoption. 

Location is the Woody Gap School, 2331 Highway 60 in Suches.

Sat., Oct. 1 &
Sun., Oct. 2,
10 a.m. - 6 p.m.

Georgia Marble Festival SGH will have an information booth at this event in Jasper to provide information about the hemlock problem, why it's so important to take timely action, what property owners can do to save their own trees, and how volunteers can help save trees on our public lands.  Healthy hemlock saplings were also available for adoption. 

Location is Lee Newton Park, 500 Stegall Drive in Jasper.

Sun., Oct. 23,
1 - 5 p.m.

SGH Leadership Team fall meetingAll Board Members, Officers, and Lead Facilitators should plan to attend.  Other interested persons are welcome.  An agenda will be posted prior to the meeting.

Location is 37 Woody Bend, Dahlonega.

 

Completed Events for FY 2016 (Dec. 1, 2015 - Nov. 30, 2016)

Fri., Dec. 4 &
Sat., Dec. 5

Kris Kringle Mountain Market:  SGH had an information booth at this festive event in Blairsville to provide information about the hemlock problem, why it's so important to take timely action, what property owners can do to save their own trees, and how volunteers can help save trees on our public lands.  Fifteen healthy hemlock saplings got new homes for the holiday.

Fri., Jan. 8

SGH Hemlock Help Clinic for Soque Garden Club.  Approximately 50 people attended this free class, and one sapling was adopted.

Sun., Jan. 10

SGH Leadership Team winter meeting. 

Click here for the meeting agenda.  Meeting notes will be posted shortly.

Mon., Jan. 11

SGH presentation to Friends of Unicoi State Park:  Approximately 20 people attended this presentation to learn more about the problem our hemlocks are having and consider participating in a volunteer project to re-evaluate trees in the Park that are due for retreatment next year.

Details for the scouting project will be posted here as soon as they're available.

Mon., Jan. 18

Martin Luther King Day of Service

Hope you all went out and did a good thing in your community today!

Thurs., Jan. 28

SGH Hemlock Help Clinic for Forsyth County Master Gardeners:  Twenty-five Master Gardeners attended this overview presentation on the invasive insect that's killing our hemlocks, what can be done to save the trees, and why it's so important to do so. 

Three lucky gardeners won large hemlock saplings donated by SGH as door prizes.

Fri., Feb. 12

SGH hemlock training in Pickens County:  An educational event sponsored by Bent Tree Forest Conservation Committee, open to all Bent Tree property owners and members of the community. 

There were 14 attendees at the Hemlock Help Clinic; 8 new Facilitators were trained; and 2 Facilitator received refresher training.  During the hands-on demo and practice segment, Facilitator trainees did charitable treatment of 40 trees for 4 property owners in Bent Tree.

Thurs., Feb. 18

SGH Hemlock Help Clinic in Atlanta:   Thirty people attended this free educational event hosted by Trees Atlanta.  The presentation, which took place at the Tree House on Krog Street, provided information about the importance of the hemlock, the invasive insect that's threatening to destroy this iconic tree, what can be done to save the hemlock, and how volunteers can help.  Special focus was placed on the value of hemlocks used in urban settings.  

Fri., Feb. 19

Arbor Day in Dahlonega:  The City of Dahlonega held an Arbor Day celebration during which Save Georgia's Hemlocks shared a brief message about the plight of the hemlocks with a group of about 25 participants, and a large hemlock sapling donated by SGH was planted in Hancock Park.

Sat., Feb. 20

Arbor Day in GeorgiaThis holiday is a day set aside for schools, civic clubs, and other organizations, as well as individuals, to reflect on the importance of trees in our state and across our nation.  Every tree planted on Arbor Day helps clean the air and water, beautify neighborhoods, provide homes for wildlife, conserve energy, and prevent soil erosion, among many other benefits. 

Arbor Day gives everyone an opportunity to learn about the benefits trees provide to communities.  You can also order tree seedlings from the Georgia Forestry Commission.

Sat., Feb. 20

SGH hemlock training in Dahlonega There were 8 attendees for the Hemlock Help Clinic; 6 new Facilitators were trained; 2 Facilitators received refresher training, and 1 professional received continuing education credit hours.  During the hands-on demon and practice segment, the Facilitator trainees did charitable treatment of 5 hemlocks on 3 properties in Dahlonega.

Wed., Feb. 24 &
Thurs., Feb. 25

North Carolina HWA Bio-Control Forum:   Presented by the Blue Ridge RC&D and partners, this forum brought together public agencies, regional councils and conservation groups, local nonprofits, and environmental professionals to address regional bio-control efforts.  Members of the SGH Leadership Team who attended came away with a great deal of both information and enthusiasm about our future role supporting bio-controls in Georgia.  SGH Chairman Donna Shearer also gave a presentation entitled "Building a Volunteer Organization to Save Hemlocks."

Fri., Mar. 11

Arbor Day in Homer:  The City of Homer held an Arbor Day celebration during which SGH gave a brief talk about the plight of the hemlocks and currently available solutions.  The ceremony also included the gift of a healthy hemlock sapling, which was accepted by Mayor Doug Cheek on behalf of the City of Homer and planted by the Georgia Forestry Commission in front of the Court House.  

Sat., Mar. 12

SGH hemlock treatment project:   Twenty-four volunteers, under the leadership of Buz Stone, retreated more than 119 large hemlocks on the Lake Rabun Narrows that were treated two years ago.  Working from pontoon boats, these hardy souls applied a fast-acting, highly effective product called Safari, using the basal trunk spray method to ensure protection of the waterway.  The day included a delicious barbecue lunch and a chance to get better acquainted with other good folks who care deeply -- and actively -- about protecting special environments such as the Lake Rabun area.

Mon., Mar. 21

International Day of Forests and the Tree:  This global celebration of forests provides a platform to raise awareness of the importance of all types of forests and of trees outside forests.

Sat., Apr. 2

SGH- USFS hemlock treatment project (day 1 of 3):  Fourteen volunteers spent a great day in the woods treating or retreating 293 hemlocks at Anna Ruby Falls.  There are more than 1,000 trees in the park that were last treated in 2009 and desperately need retreating this spring if many of them are to survive. 

On this first project day we were able to take care of all the ones around the Visitors Center and parking area and from the Visitors Center up to the falls.  The project will continue on April 23 to treat the ones from the Visitors Center out to the fee booth.  WE'LL NEED YOUR HELP THEN!  (See April 23.)

Wed., Apr. 6

SGH hemlock training in Hall County:  There were 2 attendees for the Hemlock Help Clinic, and 2 new Facilitators were trained.

Sun., Apr. 10

SGH Leadership Team spring meeting:  All Board Members, Officers, and Lead Facilitators should plan to attend.  Other interested persons are welcome.  Click here for the meeting agenda.   Meeting notes will be published soon.

Tues., Apr. 12

SGH Hemlock Help Clinic for Cornelia Garden Club -- Fifteen members received an overview presentation on the invasive insect that's killing our hemlocks, what can be done to save them, and why it's so important to do so.  Five healthy hemlock saplings got new homes!

Wed., Apr. 13

SGH hemlock training in White County There were 11 attendees for the Hemlock Help Clinic; 6 new Facilitators were trained; and 1 Facilitator received refresher training.

Fri., Apr. 13

Insectary Monitoring Workshop: To increase our knowledge and skills related to bio-controls for HWA and further explore our role in promoting integrated pest management, SGH participated in this educational workshop sponsored by Blue Ridge Resource Conservation & Development and partners.  The event included field and classroom segments on HWA and hemlock tree/stand condition, sample collection, life cycle for 2 species of HWA, examinations under microscope, and usage of ultra-violote light in hemlock/HWA research.

Sat., Apr. 16

Bear on the Square:  SGH had an information booth at this festival in Dahlonega to provide information about the hemlock problem, why it's so important to take timely action, what property owners can do to save their own trees, and how volunteers can help save trees on our public lands. 

About 125 - 150 people visited our booth to learn more about the hemlocks; we gained 16 new members, and 21 hemlock saplings found new homes.

Wed., Apr. 20

SGH hemlock training in Habersham County:  Offered but canceled for participants needing to rechedule.

Thurs., Apr. 21

SGH hemlock sapling rescue:  Two volunteers rescued 110 hemlock seedlings and approximately 75 saplings from a private property in Ellijay.  The seedlings are intended for donation to a school, and the saplings are for adoption at fairs and festivals.

Wed., Apr. 22

Earth Day:  Celebrated on April 22 annually, Earth Day is globally coordinated by the Earth Day Network, whose year-round mission is to broaden, diversify and activate the environmental movement worldwide, through a combination of education, public policy, and consumer campaigns. 

Click to read announcement of the Global Climate Change Agreement, December 12, 2016.

Fri., Apr. 22

Earth Day at High Meadows School:  SGH had an education station at the school's annual Earth Day festival, shared the hemlock message with students and their families, and helped 110 children pot hemlock seedling to take home.  Brochures about the hemlocks and planting / care instructions were also provided to all who participated.

Sat., Apr. 23

SGH- USFS hemlock treatment project (day 2 of 3):  Continuing the project that was begun on April 2, twenty-two volunteers gathered at the Anna Ruby Visitors Center in the morning for a brief orientation and then headed out for a great day in the woods.  They worked in teams to treat or retreat another 231 hemlocks along the road and stream between the parking area and the fee booth, pausing at midday for a picnic lunch.  

Everyone finished the day with a sense of great satisfaction and a rewarding kind of tiredness that comes from spending their time and energy in an endeavor that will have a significant positive  impact for years to come.  BIG THANKS TO A GREAT GROUP OF DEDICATED VOLUNTEERS -- THE HEMLOCKS LIFT THEIR BRANCHES TO YOU!

Sat., Apr. 30

Trout Fest:  SGH had an information booth at the festival in Blue Ridge to provide information about the hemlock problem, why it's so important to take timely action, what property owners can do to save their own trees, and how volunteers can help save trees on our public lands.  In honor of the event, a special handout was prepared highlighting the importance of hemlocks to the health of local trout populations

We had about 230 visitors to our booth, got new homes for 23 healthy hemlock saplings, gained 19 new members, and received $275 in donations.

Sat., Apr. 30

Our friends in Georgia Forest Watch held their annual Wild & Woolly Forest Festival today.   We hope it was a great success!

Sat., May 7

SGH hemlock training in Cherokee County There were five attendees for this training, three of who became new Facilitators.  And two hemlock saplings received new homes.

Fri., May 13

Bear Jamboree:  SGH gave a brief presentation about the hemlocks for 112 5th graders and teachers at Blackburn Elementary School near Dahlonega, led a seedling potting activity for those who wanted baby trees, and provided educational materials to take home and share with their families.

Sat., May 14

SGH-USFS hemlock treatment project:  VOLUNTEERS ARE NEEDED Eleven volunteers had a wonderful day in the woods treating or retreating more than 200 hemlocks in the Anderson Creek hemlock conservation area of the national Forest in Gilmer County.  Participants received a brief orientation and safety reminder at the start of the day and then worked in teams to treat the trees, pausing for a picnic lunch beside the waterway.   With two soil injectors per team, the work went much faster than usual.  THANKS EVERYONE FOR YOUR GREAT WORK AND SPIRIT!

Wed., May 18

Plant Conservation Day:  This global celebration is dedicated to preserving, protecting, and conserving plants for people and the planet.  Plants are the backbone of all life on Earth: they regulate our climate, purify our water, help create rich soils and protect those soils from erosion.

Plants, in their amazing diversity, are also an essential resource for human survival and well-being: they provide food, medicine, shelter, and clothing, and are a source of unending beauty.  Can you imagine what the world would be with without plants?  Click here to learn more about why plants are so important.

Unfortunately, the plants that are vital to people and the planet are facing serious threats in your backyard and around the world.   Click here to learn more about why plants need your help.

There are many ways you can help conserve plants for the planet.  Help raise awareness by celebrating your own Plant Conservation Day, or find out more about how you can make a difference.

Fri., May 20

Endangered Species Day:  Each year the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service observes Endangered Species Day in order to recognize the national conservation effort to protect our nation's endangered species and their habitats.  Click here to learn about the Endangered Species Act and find interesting ways to engage kids, families, youth groups, and educators in this important effort.

Sat., May 28 &
Sun., May 29

Blue Ridge Spring Arts in the Park Festival SGH had an information booth to provide information about the hemlock problem, why it's so important to take timely action, what property owners can do to save their own trees, and how volunteers can help save trees on our public lands.  

Over the whole weekend we had almost 500 visitors to our booth, got 42 saplings adopted, gained 30 new members, and received $515 in donations.

Sun., May 29

Lake Rabun Association Memorial Day Meeting:  SGH had an educational exhibit, gave a brief presentation to approximately 100 attendees, and provided printed hemlock information to property owners who attended the meeting in Lakemont.

Sat., June 4

National Trails Day:  A celebration of America’s magnificent Trail System, NTD occurs annually on the first Saturday in June and features a series of outdoor activities, designed to promote and celebrate the importance of trails in the United States.  Individuals, clubs and organizations from around the country host National Trails Day® events to share their love of trails with friends, family, and their communities.  NTD introduces thousands of Americans to a wide array of trail activities: hiking, biking, paddling, horseback riding, trail running, and bird watching and more.  For public and private land managers alike, National Trails Day® is a great time to showcase beautiful landscapes and special or threatened locales as thousands of people will be outside looking to participate in NTD events.

Sat., June 4

Hemlock Day at Anna Ruby Falls SGH had an information booth to provide information about the hemlock problem, why it's so important to take timely action, what property owners can do to save their own trees, and how volunteers can help save trees on our public lands.   We had about 40 visitors to our booth and got 6 healthy saplings adopted.

Sun., June 5

SGH HEMLOCK CAMP MEETING & ANNUAL MEETING 2016:  Despite torrential rain during the first half of the day, 100+ hardy souls joined us for a gathering of kindred spirits to celebrate and preserve the magnificent hemlock.   As described in the invitation flyer, this family-friendly event featured:

* educational displays and demonstrations by conservation and recreational nonprofits, the Georgia-based beetle labs, and our public land managers
* great music by Downtown Roy
* Poole's delicious barbecue plus everyone's favorite covered side dishes
* keynote speaker Dr. Bud Mayfield of the U. S. Forest Service in Asheville who shared an interesting and hopeful message about progress in the battle to save the hemlocks from the HWA, the latest scientific developments, and how individuals and groups can help (a pdf copy of his presentation has been added to the Resources page -- Other Articles & Publications section)
* healthy hemlock saplings available for adoption
* prize drawings for two quarts of local honey donated by the Gilmer County Beekeepers Association, two 5' tall hemlock saplings, and a beautiful rustic mirror made of hemlock wood created by Wilderness Wonders
* good fellowship with
other like-minded people who share a love of the outdoors and a passion for preserving it. 

Special groups that participated in our Friends Circle with educational displays and information included the American Chestnut Foundation, Back Country Horsemen of North Georgia, the predator beetle lab of North Georgia College & State University, Georgia Department of Natural Resources State Parks and Wildlife Resources Divisions, Garden Club of Ellijay, Georgia Forest Watch, Gilmer County Beekeepers Association, Gilmer County Master Gardeners, Len Foote Hike Inn, Mountain High Hikers, Trout Unlimited Blue Ridge Chapter, U. S. Forest Service, and Yahoola Outdoors.  THANK YOU!!!

Fri., June 17 &
Sat., June 18

Hemlock Help at Cloudland Canyon State Park:  An education and service event sponsored jointly by the Friends of Cloudland Canyon, the Georgia Department of Natural Resources, and SGH  to help save the hemlocks in the park. 

Friday, June 17:   SGH conducted a Facilitator Training Workshop for complete how-to instruction covering the trees, the insect pests, assessing infestations, cultural practices, chemical treatments, biological controls, cost considerations, personal and environmental safety; also volunteer training for assisting property owners, organizing neighborhood hemlock projects, working on our public lands, and more.  Three of the participants took the class as a refresher, and fourteen new Facilitators were trained.

Saturday, June 18:  Twenty volunteers spent the day treating several hundred hemlocks in selected areas of the park.  Working in small teams under the supervision of park personnel and experienced Save Georgia’s Hemlocks volunteers, they applied Imidacloprid to the trees by soil injection, which will provide an average of 5ive years of protection against the adelgids.  The day was perfect -- cool and breezy -- and everyone enjoyed a fun day in the woods, got to know other good people who love the great outdoors, and gained the satisfaction of helping to preserve the beauty and environmental health of this wonderful park.   THANKS EVERYONE!

Sat., June 25
(rescheduled from June 11)

SGH-USFS hemlock treatment project at Anna Ruby Falls (day 3 of 3):  Sixteen volunteers spent a great day in the woods to continue  treating the hemlocks at Anna Ruby Falls.  After a brief orientation and safety reminder at the start of the day, they worked in small teams to treat several hundred hemlocks with Imidacloprid by soil injection, pausing for a picnic lunch beside the stream.   Although the weather was quite hot, most of the work was in shady settings with a gentle breeze and plenty of bottled water providing relief, so it was a very good and productive day made even more so by the participation of quite a few brand new volunteers who we hope will join us again in the near future.  THANKS EVERYONE!

We estimate only about 100  trees are left to finish.   Stay tuned.

Sat., July 9

SGH Hemlock Training in Murray County:  There were 10 attendees for the Hemlock Help Clinic; 1 new Facilitator was trained; and 4 Facilitators participated for refresher training.

Sun., July 10

SGH Leadership Team summer meeting was held at the home of Donna Shearer.   Click here for the agenda.  Meeting notes will be posted shortly.

 

Completed Events for FY 2015 (Dec. 1, 2014 - Nov. 30, 2015)

Tues., Jan. 6

Whitepath Golf Course Hemlock Project (Gilmer County):  Assessment Phase

Twenty-four volunteers participated in the training session, and twenty-three worked in 7 teams to assess the health of the hemlocks on the course and select those that likely can be and should be saved.   In all, they measured, flagged, and recorded site data for 462 trees recommended for treatment.  That information along with an estimate for the chemical cost was submitted to the Gilmer County Board of Commissioners for approval.

Sun., Jan. 18

SGH Leadership Team winter meeting  Click here for the meeting notes.

Mon., Jan. 19

WAWA - OAC SignMartin Luther King Day of Service:  SGH gave a brief presentation to about a dozen people on the threat to our hemlocks from the woolly adelgid, why it matters, and what property owners and volunteers can do to save them.  We also donated 12 healthy hemlock saplings and worked with an energetic team of 7 young volunteers to plant them in the woods of the West Atlanta Watershed Alliance's Outdoor Activity Center, 1442 Richland Rd., SW, Atlanta

Fri., Jan. 30

Northeast Georgia Regional Science & Engineering Fair (Athens Technical College):  SGH had an education station to provide information about the hemlock problem, current solutions, and how young people can get involved with saving the hemlocks.  We met about 30 very bright students interested in protecting the health of our forests and waterways as well as several teachers who indicated they would like to schedule a SGH Hemlock Lesson or other hemlock-related activity for their classes.

Tues., Feb. 10

Gold Diggers Garden Club Meeting (Dahlonega):  SGH gave a brief presentation about the hemlock problem and current solutions, resources available to property owners who want to treat their own trees or find properly qualified professional help, and ways property owners and other volunteers can get involved with saving the hemlocks on public lands.   14 members were in attendance.

Fri., Feb. 20

Arbor Day in Georgia Arbor Day is a day set aside for schools, civic clubs, and other organizations, as well as individuals, to reflect on the importance of trees in our state and across our nation.  Every tree planted on Arbor Day helps clean the air and water, beautify neighborhoods, provide homes for wildlife, conserve energy, and prevent soil erosion, among many other benefits. 

Arbor Day gives everyone an opportunity to learn about the benefits trees provide to communities.  You can also order tree seedlings from the Georgia Forestry Commission.

Sat., Feb. 28

SGH Lead Facilitator Workshop:  Eleven Leadership Team members and Lead Facilitators serving Gilmer, Murray, Pickens, Rabun, Towns, Union, and White Counties participated in this workshop in Dahlonega.  The agenda covered:

* recap of 2014 accomplishments
* update on what's new with the hemlocks and SGH
* strategy and plans for 2015
* review of Lead Facilitator roles & responsibilities
* updated content, logistics, and how to teach Hemlock Help Clinic
* updated content, logistics, and how to teach Facilitator Training Workshop
* sign-up for education, service, and outreach activities

Sat., Mar. 7

SGH Lead Facilitator Workshop:  Seven Leadership Team members and Lead Facilitators serving Fannin, Gilmer, Lumpkin, Walker, and Whitfield Counties participated in this workshop in Ellijay.  The agenda was the same as for the workshop on February 28.

Tues., Mar. 17

Hemlock Sapling Rescue Project at Whitepath Golf Course (Gilmer County):  SGH led a project with volunteers from the Master Gardeners and the Garden Club of Ellijay to dig and pot small hemlock saplings that were not selected to be treated during the treatment phase of the Whitepath hemlock project.  Some of the saplings were donated to the Garden Club of Ellijay and the Georgia Mountains Master Gardeners (Dahlonega)  for their spring plant sales, and the rest will be offered for adoption by SGH throughout the year.

Fri., Mar. 2o &
Sat., Mar. 21

Georgia Mountains Master Gardeners & 4-H Plant Sale (Dahlonega):  SGH donated healthy hemlock saplings for adoption and provided planting and care instructions along with other hemlock information at this event.  Eleven healthy hemlock saplings were adopted.

Sat., Mar. 21

International Day of Forests and the Tree:  This global celebration of forests provides a platform to raise awareness of the importance of all types of forests and of trees outside forests.

Sat., Mar. 21

Spring Forward Paulding 2015:  SGH had an information booth at the festival in Dallas to provide information about the hemlock problem, why it's so important to take timely action, what property owners can do to save their own trees, and how volunteers can help save trees on our public lands.  Five healthy hemlock saplings were adopted and one was donated to the Paulding County Extension Service as a door prize

Wed., Mar. 25

Hemlock Treatment Project at Whitepath Golf Course (Gilmer County):  SGH led a project with 19 local volunteers and SGH Facilitators to treat the golf course hemlocks that were assessed and flagged in January.  The day began with a 1-hour training class.  Then the teams went out onto the course and treated 295 trees by soil injection, tagged them with pre-numbered metal tags, and recorded them on data sheets. 

Sat., Mar. 28

Trail Fest:  SGH had an information booth at the festival in Dahlonega to provide information about the hemlock problem, why it's so important to take timely action, what property owners can do to save their own trees, and how volunteers can help save trees on our public lands.  We had 104 visitors to our booth.  Healthy hemlock saplings were also available for adoption, and 7 got new homes.

Tues., Mar. 31

SGH-USFS hemlock treatment project in the Frank Gross Campground hemlock conservation area of Fannin County:  Eight volunteers (4 from SGH and 4 from the Gwinnett Tech Horticulture Club) re-treated 52 trees that had been treated 5 years ago and gave first-time treatment to 9 huge new ones.  THANKS EVERYONE for your good work preserving these beautiful trees.

Sat., Apr. 11

SGH presentation to Blue Ridge Mountain Chapter of Trout Unlimited

30 members attended and learned more about the hemlock problem (especially how it relates to the trout in our north Georgia waterways), why it's so important to take timely action, what property owners can do to save their own trees, the free help Save Georgia's Hemlocks can provide, and how volunteers can help save trees on our public lands.  

Sun., Apr. 12

SGH Leadership Team spring meeting.  Click here for the meeting notes.

Tues., Apr. 14

SGH presentation to Blue Ridge Mountains Rotary Club: 
18 members attended and learned
about the hemlock problem, why it's so important to take timely action, what property owners can do to save their own trees, the free help Save Georgia's Hemlocks can provide, and how volunteers can help save trees on our public lands. 

Sat., Apr. 18

SGH-USFS hemlock treatment project in the Blackwell Creek hemlock conservation area of Union County:  A dozen volunteers spent a beautiful half day treating 172 hemlocks in three sites, had a quick picnic lunch, and enjoyed good company in the great outdoors.  THANKS EVERYONE!

Sun., Apr. 19

 

Earth Day at Fernbank Museum of Natural History: 
SGH had an information display and gave a presentation drawing attention to the ever worsening hemlock crisis in north Georgia and recently reported in the Atlanta area!  It provided information about the vital role hemlocks play in the environment, the threat of extinction by an invasive insect and reasons it matters, steps property owners can take to save their own hemlocks, and ways they can  participate in initiatives to save them on our public lands.  Click here for the flyer.

Sun., Apr. 19

Ecumenical Earth Day Celebration:  SGH had an information booth at this festival in Dalton to provide information about the hemlock problem, why it's so important to take timely action, what property owners can do to save their own trees, and how volunteers can help save trees on our public lands.

Wed., Apr. 22

Earth Day:  2015 - Earth Day’s 45th anniversary - could be the most exciting year in environmental history, the year in which economic growth and sustainability join hands, the year in which world leaders finally pass a binding climate change treaty, the year in which citizens and organizations divest from fossil fuel investments and put their money into renewable energy solutions.  These are tough issues, but we know that what’s at stake is the future of our planet and the survival of life on earth.  On Earth Day we need you to take a stand so that together we can show the world a new direction.  It’s your turn to lead, so our world leaders can follow by example.

Wed., Apr. 22

Hemlock Treatment Project at Whitepath Golf Course (Gilmer County):  Following a short training session, seven volunteers worked to complete the final phase of this project -- treating 36 very large, very sick hemlocks Safari by basal trunk spray and about 20 more trees with Imidacloprid by soil injection -- bringing the total to 466 trees saved.  The project was organized by Paul Berrey with training and team leaders provided by Save Georgia's Hemlocks.

Fri., Apr. 24

Earth Day at High Meadows School:  SGH had an education station with hemlock seedling potting for 100 kids and some of their parents at the school in Roswell, along with hemlock information for them to take home

Sat., May 2

Go Fish Georgia 2015:  SGH had an education station with seedling potting for this Girl Scouts of North Georgia event sponsored by the Blue Ridge Mountain Chapter of Trout Unlimited at Mercier Orchards in Blue Ridge.  About 60 scouts and their families and troop leaders  visited our booth and received a healthy hemlock seedling to take home and plant.

Fri., May 8

Bear Jamboree:  SGH gave a brief presentation about the hemlocks, led a seedling potting activity for about 110 5th graders at Blackburn Elementary School in Dahlonega, and gave them some educational materials to take home and share with their families.

Sat., May 9

SGH hemlock treatment project at Camp Rainey Mountain in Rabun County:  SGH partnered with the Boy Scouts to save hemlocks on the camp's property.  Led by Dr. Ed Brown and Bob Pledger, 11 volunteers worked half a day to treat approximately 100 hemlocks that were not treated during the previous project in spring 2013.

Sat., May 9

Garden Club of Ellijay Plant Sale:  SGH donated 20 healthy hemlock saplings for adoption and provides planting and care instructions along with other hemlock information

Wed., May 15

Endangered Species Day:  Each year the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service observes Endangered Species Day in order to recognize the national conservation effort to protect our nation's endangered species and their habitats.  Click here to learn about the Endangered Species Act and find interesting ways to engage kids, families, youth groups, and educators in this important effort.

Sat., May 16

Hemlock training in Gainesville for Hall County:  Three people attended the Hemlock Help Clinic, and one new Facilitator was trained.

Sat., May 16

Hemlock training in Chatsworth for Whitfield and Murray Counties:  Three people attended the Hemlock Help Clinic; one new Facilitator was trained, and one Facilitator received refresher training.

Mon., May 18

Plant Conservation Day:  This global celebration is dedicated to preserving, protecting, and conserving plants for people and the planet.  Plants are the backbone of all life on Earth: they regulate our climate, purify our water, help create rich soils and protect those soils from erosion.

Plants, in their amazing diversity, are also an essential resource for human survival and well-being: they provide food, medicine, shelter, and clothing, and are a source of unending beauty.  Can you imagine what the world would be with without plants?  Click here to learn more about why plants are so important.

Unfortunately, the plants that are vital to people and the planet are facing serious threats in your backyard and around the world.   Click here to learn more about why plants need your help.

There are many ways you can help conserve plants for the planet.  Help raise awareness by celebrating your own Plant Conservation Day, or find out more about how you can make a difference.

Sat., May 23 &
Sun., May 24

Blue Ridge Spring Arts in the Park Festival SGH had an information booth to provide information about the hemlock problem, why it's so important to take timely action, what property owners can do to save their own trees, and how volunteers can help save trees on our public lands.   Over the two days, about 400 people visited our booth, and 28 healthy hemlock saplings were adopted.

Sun., May 24

Lake Rabun Association Memorial Day Meeting:  SGH had an educational exhibit, gave a brief presentation, and provided printed hemlock information to about 100 property owners who attended the meeting in Lakemont.

Sat., May 30

Hemlock training in Jasper for Pickens County:  Twelve people attended the Hemlock Help Clinic, and four new Facilitators were trained.

Sat., June 6

Hemlock Day at Anna Ruby Falls SGH had an information booth to provide information about the hemlock problem, why it's so important to take timely action, what property owners can do to save their own trees, and how volunteers can help save trees on our public lands.  About 100 people visited our booth, and ten healthy hemlock saplings were adopted.

Sun., June 7

National Trails Day:  A celebration of America’s magnificent Trail System, NTD occurs annually on the first Saturday in June and features a series of outdoor activities, designed to promote and celebrate the importance of trails in the United States.  Individuals, clubs and organizations from around the country host National Trails Day® events to share their love of trails with friends, family, and their communities.  NTD introduces thousands of Americans to a wide array of trail activities: hiking, biking, paddling, horseback riding, trail running, and bird watching and more.  For public and private land managers alike, National Trails Day® is a great time to showcase beautiful landscapes and special or threatened locales as thousands of people will be outside looking to participate in NTD events.

Sun., June 7

SGH 2015 Hemlock Camp Meeting:   About 130 participants, guests, and other kindred spirits gathered at the ETC Pavilion in Ellijay to celebrate and preserve the magnificent hemlock.

Click here for a recap and photos of the event.

Sat., June 13

SGH-USFS hemlock treatment project in the Noontootla hemlock conservation area of Fannin County:  Eleven volunteers worked in three teams to re-treat 120 trees and treated about 40 more for the first time.

Sat., June 20

Hemlock training in Rising Fawn for Dade & Walker Counties:  During the morning two new Facilitators participated in a new format of training that combined classroom learning at the Cloudland Canyon State Park Interpretive Center with hands-on experience treating hemlocks in the park under the supervision of two instructors.  At the same time four other volunteers were working in two teams treating trees.

During the afternoon nine volunteers worked in three teams continuing the hemlock treatment.  In all, 299 hemlocks were treated -- a very good day's work, particularly considering some of the challenging terrain in parts of the park.  THANKS EVERYONE!

Sat., June 27

Hemlock training in Ellijay for Gilmer County:  Nine people attended the Hemlock Help Clinic, and seven participated in the Facilitator Training Workshop.  Five new Facilitators were trained, and two received refresher training.

Sun., July 12

SGH Leadership Team summer meeting. 

Click here for the meeting notes.

Sat., July 25

Hemlock training in Dawsonville for Dawson CountyOne person attended the Hemlock Help Clinic and participated in the Facilitator Training Workshop.

Sat., Aug. 8

Hemlock training in Dahlonega for Lumpkin County:  Three people attended the Hemlock Help Clinic, and two new Facilitators were trained.

Thurs., Aug. 13

Hemlock training in Calhoun for Gordon County:  SGH conducted a Hemlock Help Clinic at Cooperative Extension Service Agent Greg Bowman's Lunch & Learn program for Gordon County Master Gardeners.  Nine people attended.

Mon., Aug 17

Hemlock training for Americore at Smithgall Woods

SGH provided customized classroom and hands-on training for a group of five Americore participants who are working with Brian Nichols and the Georgia Department of Natural Resources.  The focus was on the practical aspects of evaluating a HWA infestation, choosing the appropriate treatment materials and method, applying the treatment, safety considerations, and required record keeping.

Sat., Aug. 29

Hemlock training in Blue Ridge for Fannin, Union, and Towns Counties:  SGH conducted a Hemlock Help Clinic, and nine people attended.   A Facilitator Training Workshop will be scheduled later in the fall.

Fri., Sept. 4

National Wildlife Day:  Founded in 2005 and carried forward in the memory of animal lover and conservationist Steve Irwin, National Wildlife Day serves to bring awareness to the number of endangered animals nationally, as well as globally, that need to be preserved and rescued from their demise each year, and also to acknowledge zoos and outstanding animal sanctuaries and organizations globally for everything they do to help preserve this planet's animals and educate the public about conservation - especially to children....our animal's future caretakers and conservationists.

Sun., Sept. 6

Lake Rabun Association Labor Day Meeting:  SGH had an exhibit, gave a brief presentation, and provided printed hemlock information for about 100 attendees in Lakemont.

Sat., Sept. 26

National Public Lands Day:  National Public Lands Day (NPLD) is the nation's largest, single-day volunteer effort for public lands.  Its purposes are:

* educating Americans about the environment and natural resources, and the need for shared stewardship of these valued, irreplaceable lands;
* building partnerships between the public sector and the local community based upon mutual interests in the enhancement and restoration of America's public lands; and;
* improving public lands for outdoor recreation, with volunteers assisting land managers in hands-on work.

On NPLD 2015 nearly 200,000 volunteers and park visitors celebrated at 2,520 public land sites in all 50 states, the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico. 

Sat., Sept. 26

SGH-BMTA ANNUAL HIKE & HELP THE HEMLOCKS

SGH and the Benton MacKaye Trail Association teamed up again to co-sponsor this annual event in celebration of National Public Lands Day.  The event was held at Lake Winfield Scott Campground near Suches and included a choice of two morning activities -- a family-friendly hike led by members of BMTA or a hemlock treatment project with SGH and the U. S. Forest Service.  Unfortunately, the hike was rained out, but the treatment project went forward with 19 volunteers who treated or retreated about 250 trees.

Following the morning activities, everyone came together to enjoy their sack lunches at the covered pavilion beside the lake.  During dessert we heard the news from Jim Wentworth of the Forest Service about current conditions in the forest and some re-organizing of responsibilities across the Blue Ridge and Chattooga River Districts.  John Logan (Dade/Walker Counties), Dave Teffeteller (Gilmer County), and Bob Pledger (Rabun County) shared their observations about the hemlocks in their respective areas and mentioned upcoming educational and service events for this fall.  Then Donna Shearer gave a brief presentation about two more insect pests (spider mites and elongate hemlock scale) and two fungal pests (Rosellinia needle blight and tip/shoot blight) that are attacking our hemlocks.  She also provided information about the random yellow/orange patches showing up on the hemlocks now and explained that this is part of the normal hemlock life cycle in the fall as the trees prepare for new replacement needles that will  push old ones off in the spring.

Sat., Oct.3

Indian Summer Festival at Woody Gap School in Suches:  We had to cancel our information booth at this event due to a combination of heavy rain and the illness of  the SGH member who was heading up our participation.  Get well soon!

Sat., Oct. 3

Foxfire Mountaineer Festival SGH had an information booth at this fun event in Rabun County to provide information about the hemlock problem, why it's so important to take timely action, what property owners can do to save their own trees, and how volunteers can help save trees on our public lands.  Healthy hemlock saplings were also available for adoption. 

We had 75 visitors to our booth, and 2 saplings were adopted.

Sat., Oct. 3 &
Sun., Oct. 4

Marble Festival:  For the first time, SGH had an information booth at this event in Jasper to provide information about the hemlock problem, why it's so important to take timely action, what property owners can do to save their own trees, and how volunteers can help save trees on our public lands.  Healthy hemlock saplings were also available for adoption. 

Although Saturday was rained out, on Sunday we had 72 visitors to our booth, and all 12 saplings were adopted.

Sat., Oct. 10

White Horse Cove Community Association:  SGH gave a brief presentation to this Cleveland community about what's killing our hemlocks, why it's so important to take timely action, and what property owners can do to save their trees.

Sun., Oct. 18

Hemlock Sapling Planting:  SGH donated 30 healthy hemlock saplings and participated in their planting with youth and their families at an Earth Care event sponsored by the West Atlanta Watershed Alliance, Northwest Atlanta Unitarian-Universalist Church, and the Jack and Jill program.  The trees were planted in the urban forest at the WAWA Outdoor Activity Center.

Sat., Oct. 24

Hemlock training in Clarkesville for Rabun, Towns, Habersham, White, Stephens, and Banks Counties:  We had 20 attendees for the Hemlock Help Clinic, trained 8 new Facilitators, and refreshed 4 experienced Facilitators.

Sun., Oct. 25

SGH Leadership Team fall meetingMargot Wallston, new coordinator for North Carolina's Hemlock Restoration Initiative, was our special guest and provided information about biological controls as they are being used in North Carolina.  She also shared her insights about the possibilities for SGH to become more involved with biological controls here in Georgia.  We also discussed plans for next year's training classes, festival participation, treatment projects, Hemlock Camp Meeting, and several new initiatives.

Click here for the meeting agenda.  Meeting notes will be published soon.

Wed., Oct. 28

Hemlock Sapling Planting:  At a community event sponsored by the West Atlanta Watershed Alliance, the Conservation Fund, and the Atlanta Botanical Garden, local school children planted 20 healthy hemlock saplings donated by SGH at a new park in Atlanta's English Avenue neighborhood. 

Wed., Nov. 4 -
Fri., Nov. 6

Beetles Save Needles:  Members of the SGH Board participated in a workshop that provided training on predator beetle insectaries and release sites conducted by Blue Ridge Resource Conservation & Development under a grant from the Hemlock Restoration Initiative.   We visited beetle release sites at Biltmore Estates and several other locations near Asheville.  We also met a number of people representing colleges, municipalities, and public lands that have procured and released beetles, established their own insectaries, or are in the process of doing so.

Sat., Nov. 7

SGH presentation at Bent Tree:  Members of Bent Tree's Lake & Wildlife Committee received a presentation covering the devastation facing the hemlocks, the causes, consequences, and solutions. It also included information about the pine bark beetle problem and native plant life in their area.

Sat., Nov. 14

SGH-USFS hemlock treatment project in the Rock Creek hemlock conservation area off Highway 60 near Suches

Tues., Nov. 17

Cox Conserves Heroes award ceremony at WSB-TV in Atlanta Channel 2 WSB-TV and The Trust for Public Land named Tom Branch as Atlanta’s 2015 Cox Conserves Hero. Branch’s nonprofit of choice, Park Pride, will receive $10,000 on his behalf.  The three finalists were chosen by a judging panel and then competed in an online public vote to be named Atlanta’s Cox Conserves Hero.

Branch transformed an overgrown space into Frazier Rowe Park.  He has coordinated hundreds of volunteers to create a trail system and lead a forest restoration.  The workdays bring families together and help the community participate in intergenerational activities like hiking, gardening, bird watching and outdoor enjoyment.  His work is teaching future generations about community service and the importance of the environment.

The two runners-up each receive $5,000 for their nonprofits of choice.  Alan Toney selected Chattahoochee Riverkeeper, and Julie Burroughs chose Friends Group of Chattahoochee River National Recreation Area.

Wed., Nov. 18

SGH Facilitator Training Workshop in Ellijay:  This final class for 2015 was offered to all participants, regardless of county, who wanted to learn the real "nitty gritty" about how to save their own hemlocks AND receive in-depth volunteer training for assisting other property owners and working on our public lands.  Unfortunately, just as class was about to begin, a tremendous storm came through and prevented many of the registrants from attending.  We invite everyone who is interested in taking this training to check our 2016 class schedule on this page as soon as it's posted and sign up for another opportunity in the near future.

Sat., Nov. 21

SGH-USFS hemlock treatment project in the Hemlock Falls hemlock conservation area near Moccasin Creek State Park in Rabun CountyFourteen volunteers worked in three teams to re-treat 43 trees and gave first-time treatment to 139 more.

© Save Georgia's Hemlocks 2009.  Last updated 04/23/2016.
Send comments or questions by e-mail  or call the Hemlock Help LineSM  706-429-8010.